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Would you let your child fly unaccompanied seated next to…a man? If that sentence left you scratching your head, you're not the only one.

  • Photo: Getty ImagesThere are a lot of things strangers say to parents that come off as judgy, meddling or just plain stupid. The worst, of course: When are you due? When you are not, in fact, due … ever. (Been there and not wanting to be there again is the number one reason I’m attempting sit-ups these days.). But another cringe-worthy question has been coming up for me a lot lately and I want to discuss. Here’s what I’m talking about:

    I was on the security line at the airport with my four-month-old baby in the Bjorn and a friendly woman started chatting us up …

    Friendly woman: “Oh, he’s so cute. Look at his eyes! What a big boy. How old is he? He’s soooo smiley. I love his boots!”

    I smiled and nodded and answered all of her questions. We kept chatting. She told me about her grandson and how he isn’t as big as my boy yet and finally, about five minutes in, it happened…

    Friendly woman: “So, what’s his name?”

    Me: “Um, well, actually…she’s a girl and her name is Molly.”

    Then this poor woman back-peddled and

    Read More »from The Stranger Comment That Makes Me Cringe
  • Corbis If you own a trendy fitness-tracking device such as the Fitbit or the new Vivofit, you’re probably diligent about getting your recommended 10,000 steps per day (the equivalent of five miles). But you might not need to move as much as you think.

    According to Catrine Tudor-Locke, director of the Walking Behavior Laboratory at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, taking 10,000 steps isn't really necessary. “I wouldn't discourage people from taking 10,000 daily steps, but it’s not a magic or even scientifically proven number,” Tudor-Locke tells Yahoo Shine. The number originates from the 1960s, when Japanese pedometers were marketed under the name "manpo-kei" which translates to "10,000-steps meter." And as fitness trackers took off in the United States, companies adapted the goal of 10,000 steps.

    A number that better aligns with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is between 7,000 and 8,000 steps. “The CDC says people

    Read More »from 5 Health Rules You Can Ignore

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