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  • Turkey-cooking mistakes to avoid

    Avoid common turkey-cooking mistakes this holiday. (Thinkstock)Avoid common turkey-cooking mistakes this holiday. (Thinkstock)Whether you're a first-timer or a seasoned pro, cooking a turkey can be overwhelming — but it doesn't have to be.

    There are several common mistakes that people make when it comes to making a holiday turkey from the prep to the cooking and even serving.

    Yahoo! Canada Shine recently spoke with Tom Fillipou, executive chef for President's Choice to learn about some common turkey-cooking mistakes you should avoid this holiday season and what things you should be doing so that your feast goes off without a hitch.

    Starting off with high heat

    Fillipou says that one of the biggest mistakes people make when roasting a turkey is starting the bird off at a very high heat in order to get a golden colour on their turkey.

    "I know that a lot of bad recipes tell them to do that, so it's really not their fault," he says, "but the best thing you can do with turkey is to do it low and slow, and baste a lot."

    While there are many methods for preparing a turkey, from deep-frying to the paper bag method,

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  • The 'Glamburger' burger is topped with Iranian-saffron-poached Canadian lobster, maple syrup-coated streaky bacon, Beluga caviar and hickory smoked duck egg covered in edible gold leaf.The 'Glamburger' burger is topped with Iranian-saffron-poached Canadian lobster, maple syrup-coated streaky bacon, Beluga caviar and hickory smoked duck egg covered in edible gold leaf.
    At Honky Tonk, an American diner-style restaurant in London, England, patrons can order a burger like nothing they’ve ever seen — or paid for — before: the £1,100 ($1,980 CAD) Glamburger.

    The Glamburger’s patty is made with Kobe Wagyu beef and New Zealand venison, stuffed with black truffle brie, and seasoned with smoked Himalayan salt. 

    The burger is topped with Iranian-saffron-poached Canadian lobster, maple syrup-coated streaky bacon, Beluga caviar and hickory smoked duck egg covered in edible gold leaf. 

    And because you can never have too much gold leaf on your burger, the bun is also coated in gold leaf — and seasoned with Japanese matcha and cream mayonnaise. 

    Chef Chris Large tops off his culinary creation, which took three weeks to develop, with a mango and champagne jus and grated white truffle. 

    "After sourcing the best possible ingredients to create this masterpiece, the winner will certainly have a dinner to remember," Large says in a press release.

    Not only will it empty

    Read More »from London restaurant creates the $2,000 'Glamburger,' world's most expensive burger
  • As you prep for Thanksgiving dinner, The Kitchn is answering the age-old question: What’s the difference between yams and sweet potatoes?

    Grocery stores often get it wrong, labelling sweet potatoes as yams. So, what’s the difference?

    Or is there one?

    Yams and sweet potatoes are not related. Yams are related to lilies, can be as small as a white potato or as long as 5 feet. They have rough, bark-like skin and white, purple or reddish flesh. They’re starchier and drier than sweet potatoes, have more of a cylindrical shape, and are more difficult to find at grocery stores.

    If you need yams and can’t find them, try an international food market that carries Caribbean or African foods, suggests The Globe and Mail's Leslie Beck.

    Yams have rough, bark-like skin and white, purple or reddish flesh. (Thinkstock)Yams have rough, bark-like skin and white, purple or reddish flesh. (Thinkstock)

    Sweet potatoes, on the other hand, have either an elongated shape with tapered ends or a traditional potato shape and come from the morning glory family. Sweet potatoes have white, yellow, red, purple or brown skins and have white, yellow, orange, or orange-red

    Read More »from Yams vs. sweet potatoes: What's the difference?

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