Blog Posts by Nadine Kalinauskas

  • Candy corn-inspired desserts perfect for Halloween

    This week is a candy-corn lover’s dream. We’ve rounded up some crave-worthy candy corn-inspired recipes sure to satisfy every sweet tooth.

    Celebrate the season with candy corn-inspired recipes. (Thinkstock)Celebrate the season with candy corn-inspired recipes. (Thinkstock)

    Make your own:

    You can satisfy your cravings year round if you know how to make candy corn yourself. 

    You don’t need industrial equipment — or four to five days — to make your own candy corn, thanks to this Homemade Candy Corn recipe from Cakespy’s Jessie Oleson. 

    “This surprisingly simple recipe yields large, plump candy kernels infused with a sweet vanilla flavour. I found that using salted butter adds a nice, rich finish. Conclusion? These homespun tricolour treats are definitely worth the time and effort. Once you’ve tasted them, you may never buy candy corn by the bag again,” Oleson writes

    Bright idea: use red and green food colouring and you might be able to get away with snacking on these at a Christmas party, too!

    Alton Brown also has a recipe for Candy Corn — and offers step-by-step photos of the process.

    Desserts inspired by the look of

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  • Is it safe to eat mouldy food?

    When you spot a blue corner growing on a block of cheese, should you toss the entire thing? Or can you scrape off the offending bit of mould and keep using that cheddar?

    Can you still eat mouldy cheddar cheese? (Thinkstock)Can you still eat mouldy cheddar cheese? (Thinkstock)

    According to experts on BBC’s Trust Me, I’m a Doctor, it’s actually pretty safe to cut off the mould and keep using some foods — but not all. 

    Here’s a rundown of what you can keep, and what you should toss. 

    Keep

    Mouldy hard, dry cheese. Hard cheeses like cheddar and Parmesan are too dry to allow mould to thrive, so mould rarely spreads too deeply into the cheese. Cut off the mould — removing an extra centimetre or so below the visible mould — and you’re good to go. And make sure to rewrap the cheese in fresh packaging. 

    Mouldy blue cheese. Moulds that are part of the manufacturing process are fine. If surface mould starts growing on hard cheeses like Gorgonzola and Stilton, cut it off and the surrounding area before using.

    Mouldy firm vegetables. If the vegetable is firm, like a carrot or pepper, cut off the mould

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  • Burning off the binge: How to work off your Halloween candy

    ThinkstockThinkstock
    Halloween candy is tiny. Surely it can’t do that much damage to your diet, right?

    Well, dust off those running shoes. We’re taking a look at some of our favourite trick-or-treat indulgences and what it takes to burn them off.

    Candy Corn (140 calories)

    ThinkstockThinkstock

    Just one small bag (about 26 pieces) of Brach’s Candy Corn will cost you an extra 19 minutes on the tennis court, or 48 minutes of marching in your local Halloween parade

    Tootsie Roll (25 calories)

    ThinkstockThinkstock
    You’ll burn off more than just one Tootsie Roll while trick-or-treating with your kids. Walk for a quarter-mile — about 500 steps — and your waistline will never know you indulged. 

    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (67 calories)

    Dance off your chocolate bar at the costume party in just 15 minutes. 

    Two fun-size packs of Milk Chocolate M&Ms (180 calories)

    Courtesy M&M'sCourtesy M&M's
    Because you can’t stop at one. Burn off Friday night’s candy binge at an apple orchard on Saturday morning. One hour of apple picking should do the trick. 

    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup (110

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  • How to pull off bright lip colour

    Last night in Toronto, Beyonce’s sister, Solange Knowles made a surprise appearance at World Mastercard Fashion Week as the DJ at the Joe Fresh party

    The 28-year-old trendsetter showed up in a Joe Fresh leather jacket, wearing the coolest shade of violet lipstick — isn’t she always wearing the best candy-coloured shades?

    And now we’re obsessed with her bright lip look.

    Solange Knowles at the Joe Fresh party at Toronto Fashion Week on Monday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)Solange Knowles at the Joe Fresh party at Toronto Fashion Week on Monday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

    Not sure how to pull it off? Here are a few tips for making the bold look your own — without looking like you’re trying too hard. 

    Pick Your Shade

    Start with what you’re attracted to: reds, oranges, pinks or purples. 

    “Finding a hot pink lip colour is like finding any other accessory — choose what you’re attracted to!” says International Lead Makeup Artist for NARS Cosmetics, James Boehmer. “Hot pink, fuchsia, magenta — the colour looks great with all skin tones and is worn just like you wear any other statement making lip — with confidence.” 

    Refinery29 calls the purple lipstick trend “surprisingly flattering”:

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  • Ginger recipes, just in time for flu season

    With cold and flu season comes the home remedies — and many of us are reaching for the ginger this fall. 

    The versatile herb can be used fresh, dried, powdered, as a juice or an oil. And while it’s most commonly used as a spice and flavouring agent, it’s also used medicinally.

    According to WebMD, ginger is commonly used to treat “stomach problems” such as motion sickness, morning sickness, nausea, gas and diarrhea, and can also be used for pain relief from arthritis, menstrual pain, muscle soreness, bronchitis, and even chest pain. 

    One study found that ginger might even slow the growth of colorectal cancer cells. 

    It can also help strengthen immunity and is frequently used to aid digestion

    Fresh ginger has many health and culinary uses. (Thinkstock)Fresh ginger has many health and culinary uses. (Thinkstock)

    Topically, fresh ginger juice can be poured on the skin to treat burns. Ginger oil can be used as a topical pain reliever, too. 

    It should be noted that there are some precautions that should be taken when using ginger medicinally. Pregnant women should limit their ginger intake to 1g a day, and

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  • The 5 garment care skills everyone should know

    There are 5 basic clothing care skills everyone should know. (Thinkstock)There are 5 basic clothing care skills everyone should know. (Thinkstock)According to a new study out the University of Missouri-Columbia, millennials don’t know how to take care of their clothes. 

    A significant gap exists in the amount of ‘common’ clothes repair skills possessed by members of the baby boomer generation and millennials, research has found. The study found that many more of the baby boomer generation possess skills such as sewing, hemming, button repair and general laundry knowledge than Americans 18-33 years of age,” the researchers conclude

    Skills that were once taught in the home or at school are no longer being learned. 

    This lack of clothes-repair knowledge is contributing to tons of textile waste each year. When people can’t fix a tear or remove a stain themselves, they often toss out the garment. 

    "If we, as a nation, want to move toward more sustainable practices in all aspects, we need to evaluate not only how we take care of our clothes, but how we educate younger generations to do so as well," says Pamela Norum, a professor in

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  • How to pair candy and wine this Halloween

    If you expect to “borrow” from your kids’ candy stash this Halloween — or you’re planning an adults-only costume party — we’ve got just the news for you: how to pair candy with wine. 

    The Candy & Wine Matchmaker" by Vivino — otherwise known as the "Halloween survival guide for adults" — lists popular trick-or-treat loot items with the wines best suited to them. 

    via Vivinovia Vivino

    Binging on Tootsie Rolls? Sip on a dessert wine, like port, sherry or ice wine.

    Can’t get enough M&M’s? A medium or bold red pairs perfectly. 

    And stick to dry or sweet white wines if you’re stealing all the Skittles from the candy pile. 

    A Hershey’s chocolate bar appears to pair with just about anything — rich whites, sweet whites, light reds and medium reds — so if you’re having a wine and candy party at the end of the month, be sure to have plenty of those on hand. 

    Of course, the chart works in reverse, too. Pick the wine you’re drinking and it will lead you to the candy you’re missing out on. 

    If you’re toasting with

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  • Decorating with pumpkins? Try cooking with them, too!

    Make the most of this seasonal centrepiece. (Thinkstock)Make the most of this seasonal centrepiece. (Thinkstock)If you’re decorating with pumpkins this month — as chic centrepieces or as scary Jack-o’-lanterns on the front porch — don’t toss them (or their insides) out when you’re done with your seasonal decor. 

    Here are some recipes to help you make the most of those pumpkins. 

    The seeds.

    Pumpkin seeds are a tasty snack that are far healthier than Halloween candy: they’re packed with fibre, protein, and magnesium.

    Toss the seeds in oil and salt and roast them in the oven, or go gourmet by boiling them in salted water first, then adding additional spices. Cinnamon, brown sugar, smoked paprika, cumin and chill powder all work.

    Follow the brined-and-toasted recipe from Simply Recipes here.

    And here are three ways to roast pumpkin seeds, courtesy of the Brown Eyed Baker. 

    The guts. 

    Before you relegate the stringy bits inside your pumpkin to the compost pile, make a pumpkin stock to use in soups and casseroles. 

    The flesh.

    Typically, the flesh of large pumpkins purchased for Jack-‘o-lantern

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  • How to properly store Thanksgiving leftovers

    'Tis the week for holiday leftovers.

    Not sure how long you can safely keep the Thanksgiving bird in the fridge?

    Registered dietitian Leslie Beck tells the Globe and Mail that most leftovers can be stored safely in the fridge for three to four days — as long as they’re stored properly. 

    How long will those Thanksgiving leftovers last? (Thinkstock)How long will those Thanksgiving leftovers last? (Thinkstock)To keep foods safe, make sure your fridge temperature is set at 4°C or colder. 

    Bacteria flourishes within the temperature range of 4°C to 60°C, so Beck recommends storing leftovers in the fridge in airtight containers or packaging them within two hours of taking the food out of the oven. 

    Health Canada advises Canadians to store different types of leftovers separately, and to use clean containers or leak-proof plastic bags to prevent cross-contamination. 

    And, yes, you can put hot foods directly in the refrigerator, just divide them into smaller portions and shallow containers so they’ll cool quickly.

    “You don’t want to try and chill anything in a deep container because it will be too difficult for that

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  • Stuffing vs. dressing: What's the difference?

    What’s the difference between stuffing and dressing? It depends on who you ask. 

    Some literalists believe stuffing must be stuffed inside a bird to earn its name, while dressing is the stuffing-like stuff you cook outside the bird. 

    Others just choose to call their stuffing “dressing” because it sounds, well, more polite.

    The National Turkey Federation claims that “both terms are used interchangeably.”

    Geography might have something to do with it.

    Whether you call it stuffing or dressing, no holiday meal is complete without it. (Thinkstock)Whether you call it stuffing or dressing, no holiday meal is complete without it. (Thinkstock)According to Pop Sugar, “Go south of the Mason-Dixon line, and cooks will call it dressing, regardless of its preparation, citing the term ‘stuffing’ as an unpleasant-sounding word. Likewise, northern states and New Englanders generally refer to the dish as stuffing across the board.”

    Epicurious found the same thing — but concluded that the term “stuffing” comes out on top:

    "Stuffing" remains the most-searched term online, while dressing-lovers in the South tend to keep their searches specific: “cornbread dressing” or “John Besh Oyster

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