Blog Posts by Nadine Kalinauskas

  • How to love the body you're in

    Last week was Healthy Weight Week, but we believe every day is a new opportunity to learn to love the body you have.

    We spoke to Lisa Naylor, a Winnipeg-based eating-disorder-treatment counsellor and Dove self-esteem consultant, about embracing healthy habits — and learning to love the skin we’re in. 

    There are some things you can do every day to build a positive body image. (Thinkstock)There are some things you can do every day to build a positive body image. (Thinkstock)

    SHINE ON: “Healthy weight” and “ideal weight” are not always the same thing. How can we set realistic goals/expectations for ourselves when it comes to weight and body image?

    NAYLOR: I prefer the term “healthy body” because people can be healthy at wide variety of weights, shapes and sizes. Realistic goals include making small incremental changes to improve health behaviours, if that feels important to the individual. I like to think of “adding in” rather than “taking away”… so adding in more fruits and vegetables, adding in more walking or a weekly yoga class, adding in more water. These kinds of goals are attainable and rarely lead to guilt or preoccupation with weight or body.

    What

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  • Sprouts: How (and why) to grow your own

    Got sprouts?

    Nutritionist Julie Daniluk is sharing her enthusiasm for all things sprouts with Shine On readers — and walks us though how to sprout at home. 

    “I think it’s worth the effort,” Daniluk says. “The neat thing is, it takes you about 10 minutes to do it, and then you simply nurture it along…It’s just a little bit of effort to get the setup going. But once you’ve got that done, then it’s really fun and it’s saving you a lot of digestive stress.”

    We’ve been converted: 2015 is the year of the sprout. 

    We think 2015 is the year of the sprout. (Thinkstock)We think 2015 is the year of the sprout. (Thinkstock)

    What are sprouts?

    “To define a sprout, I would say that it is a ‘baby plant,’ Daniluk tells Shine On. “It’s taking it from its incubated form and starting to grow it into its full-sized plant. Consider it like a little egg. It would be the seed. When it sprouts, it’s quite similar to, in human biology, when something gets fertilized and all of a sudden it comes alive in a different way. So by sprouting something, you take it from its hibernation form into its fully alive state,

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  • How to host your own Robbie Burns Day supper

    January 25th is Robbie Burns Day.

    Instead of squeezing into your local Scottish pub — a heads up: many pubs’ Robbie Burns Day suppers are sold out already — why not host your own dinner in honour of the beloved Scottish poet?

    Donna Wolff, co-owner for The Caledonian in Toronto shared with us the rundown of a traditional Robbie Burns Day supper.

    The Menu:

    “Traditionally a Burns Supper is a soup — cock-a-leekie or Cullen skink — followed by haggis, neeps & tatties and then a sweet finish of clootie pudding, sticky toffee pudding or cranachan,” Wolff tells Shine On by email.

    The most important item on the menu, of course, is the famous haggis.

    “Haggis is Scotland’s national dish and is a sheep’s heart, liver and lungs, steel cut oats, suet, onions and many secret spices,” she continues. “It is encased in a sheep’s stomach and simmered for several hours.”

    Haggis, neeps and tatties. (Thinkstock)Haggis, neeps and tatties. (Thinkstock)

    Up to the challenge of making your own? Try one of these haggis recipes:

    1. A traditional haggis recipe from Rampant Scotland: 
    2. Baked
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  • Iconic foods that were ruined when their recipes were changed

    Oh, the horror.

    Cadbury is under fire for messing with a very good thing: its famous Cadbury Creme Eggs are getting a new shell. 

    Instead of biting into a gooey egg with a traditional Cadbury Dairy Milk shell, British chocolate lovers will now get a taste of a “standard, traditional Cadbury milk chocolate” — or “disgusting, foul, vomit-inducing ‘standard cocoa mix chocolate’,” as a Guardian writer described it — shell this Easter. 

    They’ll also be sold in packs of five, instead of six — offending the customers who want to buy their candy eggs in the same denominations as their farm-fresh ones. 

    In short, Cadbury fans are not amused. Cue the “melting down” and “shellshock” puns. There’s a petition begging for the old shell’s return. One emotional fan even wrote a song about it:

    Local readers, rejoice. Other than some new packaging, there is no change to Cadbury Creme Eggs in Canada this year. 

    We do know how the British are feeling, however. We’re still reeling from these unnecessary

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  • 2015 food trends to be on the lookout for

    What’s going to be big in food for 2015? Everyone is weighing in. 

    Here’s our take on the hottest food trends we expect to see in 2015. 

    1. Bone broth.

    Healing bone broth is easy to make yourself. (Thinkstock)Healing bone broth is easy to make yourself. (Thinkstock)

    This winter’s “miracle drink” isn’t going anywhere. Experts expect this nutrient-dense — and paleo-friendly, for those unwilling to let go of one of the biggest diet trends of 2014ancient health remedy will continue being at hit in the new year. 

    Make your own sipping bone broth using this recipe.

    2. Cauliflower.

    Cauliflower is set to become the new kale. (Thinkstock)Cauliflower is set to become the new kale. (Thinkstock)

    Already growing in popularity on restaurant menus around North America, we expect to be ordering more cauliflower steaks, roasted cauliflower and cauliflower soups in the coming year. 

    It’s being called “the new kale.” We’re just hoping it doesn’t take off as a baby name, too.

    3. Ugly root veggies.

    Give ugly root veggies a chance in 2015. (Thinkstock)Give ugly root veggies a chance in 2015. (Thinkstock)

    “In line with growing concerns over food waste, this French-born trend gives misshapen and funny-looking produce a place at the table and in recipes where looks don’t matter,” says the Sterling-Rice Group.

    Veggies don’t have to

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  • Hidden sources of gluten — and how to avoid them

    We have plenty of friends who have gone gluten-free, whether it’s due to celiac disease, gluten sensitivities or just as a (not-always-effective) weight-loss strategy.

    But what is gluten, exactly? And how can we make sure we’re not inadvertently serving it to dinner guests who can’t stomach it? 

    Dietician Alexandra Anca, Nutrition Advisor to the Toronto Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association, tells us everything we need to know about gluten — and the hidden sources we should look out for. 

    Sources of gluten aren't always this obvious. (Thinkstock)Sources of gluten aren't always this obvious. (Thinkstock)

    Shine On: We hear so much about it, but what is gluten, exactly? 

    Anca: Gluten is the common name for a major protein found in wheat and related grains such as barley, rye, spelt, kamut or triticale. Gluten is a very large and complex molecule that is hard to digest in all individuals. For those who have the genetic makeup that predisposes them to celiac disease, gluten becomes toxic and triggers the body’s autoimmune system to attack and damage the lining of the small intestine, and, much like

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  • Surviving the holidays without meat

    Whether you’re a vegetarian or your dinner guests are, it can be a challenge making holiday feasts feel special without that famous turkey/ham/roast beast as the centrepiece of the table. 

    We asked Los Angeles-based Nutritionist Ally Ramser for advice on surviving the season without meat. 

    Vegetarians and meat-eaters can easily share a meal at the holidays with minor adjustments. (Thinkstock)Vegetarians and meat-eaters can easily share a meal at the holidays with minor adjustments. (Thinkstock)

    Shine On: Meat protein is often the star of the meal during the holidays. Do you have any suggestions for a festive meat-free alternative?

    Ramser: There are several ways to incorporate a meat-free entrée. Be creative! Savoury tarts, loafs, and pies go well with vegetarian gravy — think mushroom Wellington or vegetarian shepherd’s pie.

    Some other ideas include sweet potato enchiladas or stuffed acorn squash. 

    For those planning a vegetarian feast, how can they avoid turning the meal into only a series of side dishes?

    To avoid turning the meal into a series of side dishes, include an entrée normally reserved for special occasions such as homemade vegetarian lasagna.

    An entrée does not need to include

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  • 2014 food trends we’re happy to see die

    With the year nearly over, we’re looking back at some of 2014’s most over-hyped and underwhelming food trends - especially, the ones we’re sick and tired of. 

    No offense to fancy, overpriced toast - but your 15 minutes of fame is totally over.

    Food trend we’re over: Sriracha everything.

    Goodbye, sriracha everything. (Thinkstock)Goodbye, sriracha everything. (Thinkstock)

    Sriracha had its moment — a huge one — in 2014. Every fast food chain had a spicy item to showcase it, hoping to keep up with the demand for hotter foods

    There’s nothing wrong with adding a little heat to your meals, but we’re up for taking the non-Sriracha route to get there. We’re pretty excited about Baum + Whiteman’s predictions that sweet-spicy sauces are about to take off. We’re ready for you, jalapeño honey.

    Food trend we’re over: pumpkin spice everything. 

    See you later, pumpkin spice. (Thinkstock)See you later, pumpkin spice. (Thinkstock)

    We love us a good pumpkin pie. And we’re even OK with the occasional overpriced autumnal latte. But we draw the line at pumpkin-spice peanut butter, margarine and vodka

    We’ve reached peak pumpkin spice; it’s time to move on, please. 

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  • Surviving the holidays without gluten

    It’s not easy being gluten-free — nor is it always easy figuring out what to serve guests who can’t, or simply don’t, eat gluten. 

    We asked registered holistic nutritionist Sarah Maughan to help us navigate a gluten-free holiday meal. 

    Shine On: For readers hosting gluten-free guests this holiday season, what do we need to know as we menu-plan and prep (other than just ditch the flour)?

    Maughan: When hosting guests who require gluten-free diets, it’s important to have a conversation with them first and share your menu thoughts with them so they feel confident and comfortable about the meal. It also gives them a chance to have a conversation about cross-contamination — because you’re right, it’s not just omitting flour that’s important, it’s about sauces, and contaminated utensils that often create the most reactions.

    Holiday classics (like shortbread) can be made gluten-free with a few modifications. (Image via Sarah Maughan)Holiday classics (like shortbread) can be made gluten-free with a few modifications. (Image via Sarah Maughan)

    Make sure you ask your guest about cross-contamination and how to avoid accidentally adding gluten to a gluten-free dish — for example using the same mixing bowl for a

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  • What should I do when I get a gift I hate?

    ’Tis the season to give — and receive. But what should you do when you receive a gift you really don’t like?

    We went to etiquette expert Karen Cleveland to find out. 

    When in doubt, always express gratitude, appreciate the sentiment, and don’t throw out those ugly sweaters from Grandma.

    Always express gratitude for a gift -- even if you hate it. (Thinkstock)Always express gratitude for a gift -- even if you hate it. (Thinkstock)

    SHINE ON: What should you do if you receive a gift you hate — and you just opened it in front of the giver?

    Cleveland: Express your gratitude. Every gift, no matter how simple or extravagant deserves the same sincere thank you.  

    Is there ever an occasion when you should keep the gift (decor, jewelry, etc.) even though it’s not your style?

    Absolutely, for sentimental reasons. That gift, though not “you,” might come to mean something in years to come. 

    What if the gift is from someone close to you — a significant other, for example — and you’re really disappointed in their choice? Is it ever OK to broach the subject of gift expectations?

    No. In fact, the question makes me really sad. It sucks the true

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